RACE MATTERS

The latest content on all matters regarding race

RACE MATTERS

The latest content on all matters regarding race

The race matters blog

The latest content on all matters concerning race

Welcome to our blog, Race Matters, where you can read the latest content on all matters to do with race.

Race Matters aims to bring new perspectives to matters of racial (in)justice, including topics which people may not associate with race. We encourage blogs that shed new light on an issue and are backed up by evidence. We value personal stories that illustrate impact and give perspective.

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Education

‘All they want is the chance to clear their names’: The English-language test scandal 

Thousands of international students have had their lives devastated after being accused of cheating on an English-language test, in a case that has been compared to the Post Office Horizon scandal. As legal proceedings continue, Nazek Ramadan of charity Migrant Voice, which is campaigning on the issue, provides some vital context.

Nazek Ramadan
February 22, 2024
7 minutes

Employment

Unlocking career opportunities for young Black men

Action for Race Equality has been working to end racial inequality in the education, employment and justice systems since 1991. The charity’s pioneering Moving on Up programme seeks to improve employment outcomes for young Black men aged 16-24 in London. Nina Meghji speaks to Ian Moya, a science teacher and ambassador for the initiative, about championing the career goals of young Black men, navigating his own employment pathway, and why confidence, exposure and representation are the key.

Nina Meghji
January 28, 2024
7 minutes

Climate emergency

Racial justice and the climate emergency

Globally, entrenched racialised inequalities mean that people of colour and Indigenous groups are the most severely affected by the impacts of the climate emergency. In response, writes the Runnymede Trust’s Nannette Youssef, a parliamentary inquiry has been launched to examine the issues. 

Nannette Youssef
January 9, 2024
7 minutes

Sport

Diversifying the world of aquatics

In England, more than 90 per cent of Black and Asian adults and around 80 per cent of Black and Asian children do not swim, according to figures from Sport England. It is a situation that the Black Swimming Association (BSA) is determined to change. Nellie Khossousi speaks to BSA co-founder, broadcast journalist and former elite swimmer Seren Jones about how the charity is diversifying the world of aquatics and raising awareness about water safety among Black and Asian communities.

Nellie Khossousi
December 14, 2023
7 minutes

Technology

Tackling racial disparities on Wikipedia

One of the world’s most popular websites, Wikipedia is a vital resource for people across the globe, yet marginalised communities remain underrepresented in terms of both entries and editors. ‍Campaign groups and volunteers are working hard to address the imbalance, writes David Jesudason.

David Jesudason
November 22, 2023
7 minutes

Islamophobia

Islamophobia Awareness Month: Prevent, prejudice and precariousness

Last week marked the start of Islamophobia Awareness Month (IAM), a campaign founded in 2012 to showcase the positive contributions of Muslims and raise awareness of Islamophobia. Both ambitions are laudable, but they also betray a troubling truth about the pernicious nature of the experiences of the Muslim community in the UK in 2023, writes the Runnymede Trust’s Shabna Begum. IAM reminds us that we continually need to prove our lived reality of everyday discrimination and that the terms of our belonging requires us to regularly demonstrate our ‘added value’ to British society.

Dr Shabna Begum
November 9, 2023
8 minutes

Politics

Half-hearted commitments and harmful rhetoric

Rather than proposing decisive action to tackle racial disparities, the recent Conservative and Labour party conferences merely provided vague promises and provocative statements. The Runnymede Trust’s Nannette Youssef reports. 

Nannette Youssef
November 5, 2023
5 minutes

Migration

Putting down roots

Fences & Frontiers aims to make London a welcoming, supportive and inspiring place to live for refugees and people seeking asylum, including by providing trips to green spaces in and around the capital. Writer Taran N Khan recently joined the charity on an evocative walk in Kew gardens, an experience that proved to be a ‘terrain of shared memories’.

Taran N Khan
November 1, 2023
7 minutes

Culture

Blurring boundaries

A partnership between the Runnymede Trust and Penguin Random House, the Lit in Colour programme helps schools to make the teaching and learning of English literature more inclusive. At its first teacher conference this summer, the Runnymede Trust’s Lesley Nelson-Addy spoke to Bernardine Evaristo, the renowned author of 10 books, including the bestselling novel Girl, Woman, Other, which won the Booker Prize in 2019 and made her the first writer with Black heritage to claim the award in its 50-year history. This is an edited extract from their interview.

Lesley Nelson-Addy
October 11, 2023
7 minutes

Food and drink

Illuminating Britain’s Desi pubs

In his new book, Desi Pubs, award-winning journalist and beer writer David Jesudason travels across the UK, visiting more than 200 pubs run by British-South Asian landlords who have stamped their unique identities on their establishments. He speaks to Shafik Meghji about the history of these much-loved institutions, how they have become a great success story of multiculturalism, and the importance of mixed grills.

Shafik Meghji
October 6, 2023
7 minutes

Education

Building an anti-racist classroom

Building on her experience as a headteacher in London, education and racial literacy consultant Orlene Badu’s new book, How to Build Your Antiracist Classroom, is a practical guide to tackling racism in schools. Here she discusses the inspiration behind the book, her key advice for teachers, and how to help children build a ‘thriving mindset’. 

Orlene Badu
September 22, 2023
5 minutes

Education

Sidelining Black British history 

On 25 August, the University of Chichester officially announced it was axing its groundbreaking MRes (research masters) course on the history of Africa and the African diaspora and making Professor Hakim Adi – the first Black professor of this subject in the UK – redundant. Current students and graduates of the course – including the Runnymede Trust’s Hannah Francis – had been notified that this devastating move was under consideration the previous month. In this personal response, she writes about why Professor Adi’s work and course are so vital.

Hannah Francis
September 14, 2023
7 minutes

Society

Reflections on A Small Light

Focusing on the story of Miep Gies, who played a crucial role in hiding Anne Frank and her family during the Nazi occupation of Amsterdam, the Disney+ series A Small Light illustrates how dehumanising discourse can quickly become normalised in society. It is a message that has a powerful resonance today, writes Amy Jaffa.

Amy Jaffa
August 24, 2023
7 minutes

Migration

Hear our stories

The subject of migration dominates political and media debates, yet we rarely hear the voices of the people at the sharp end – the migrants and refugees themselves. A new book produced by TogetherInTheUK – a social enterprise that provides an unbiased communications platform for migrants and refugees to safely share their stories, while offering reliable advice and insights in life in the UK – aims to put that right. Featuring a foreword by Lord Alf Dubs, Hear Our Stories: An Anthology of Writings on Migration is a powerful collection of poetry and prose about hope, despair, gratitude, sadness and relief by people who have journeyed to the UK in search of a better life. The following are edited extracts from the book. 

Daniel Habte and Kisa
August 31, 2023
5 minutes

Media

Between the lines

In his research into the coverage of homicide incidents in London, crime and justice analyst Patrick Olajide sought to understand how the press talks about Black victims of crime. What he discovered was an 'almost surgical indifference' to the tragic loss of human life.

Patrick Olajide
August 10, 2023
5 minutes

Food

A love letter to Chinese takeaways 

Award-winning writer and editor Angela Hui’s first book, Takeaway: Stories From a Childhood Behind the Counter, is a food memoir about her experience of growing up in a Chinese takeaway in rural Wales. It shines a light on the food, culture and identity of East and Southeast Asian communities and their experiences of racism and discrimination in the UK. Hui, a former Time Out food and drink editor and HuffPost lifestyle reporter, speaks to Nina Meghji about reliving her painful past, the book’s unexpected readership, harnessing her cultural identity, and why battered sausages often appear on Chinese takeaway menus.

Nina Meghji
August 4, 2023
7 minutes

Policing

Black people as perennial suspects: the racialised policing of music festivals

Our Sophia Purdy-Moore on the racialised, and hypocritical, nature of how British music festivals are policed. Black people are subject to suspicion, criminalisation, and over-policing based on deeply rooted and racist perceptions that ‘Blackness’ is inherently violent, disruptive, and in need of controlling.

Sophia Purdy-Moore
July 18, 2023
5 minutes

Health

The NHS at 75: Racial disparities and reliance

Today marks the 75th anniversary of the NHS. Since its foundation, the service has relied upon doctors, nurses and staff from Black, Asian and racially marginalised backgrounds, yet systemic racism and stark racial disparities in diagnosis and treatment remain entrenched, writes Dr Annabel Sowemimo. 

Dr Annabel Sowemimo
July 5, 2023
7 minutes

Society

Examining the ‘racial code’ 

Academic, author and consultant Professor Nicola Rollock’s new book, The Racial Code, explores the ‘subtle forms of racism’ that govern our lives but often slip under the radar. She talks to Shafik Meghji about using fictional stories rooted in fact to illuminate everyday racism, offering readers fresh perspectives, and the importance of self-care. 

Shafik Meghji
June 29, 2023
7 minutes

Migration

Bittersweet anniversary

Tomorrow marks the 75th anniversary of the HMT Empire Windrush berthing at Tilbury Docks, yet the celebrations will be tinged with sadness given the ongoing Windrush scandal and the clamour of the current immigration debate. We need substantive change rather than symbolic gestures, writes Halima Begum, CEO of the Runnymede Trust. 

Halima Begum
June 21, 2023
5 minutes

Society

Celebrating the Windrush generation at 75

Today’s national Windrush Day marks the 75th anniversary of the arrival of the passengers of the Empire Windrush to the UK from the Caribbean. It is a chance to both celebrate the profound contribution of the Windrush generation, who came from across the Commonwealth, to British society and redouble our efforts to challenge the ongoing injustices they continue to face, writes social commentator and activist Patrick Vernon.

Patrick Vernon
June 22, 2023
5 minutes

Identity

‘A relentless chipping away’

From fuel poverty to a lack of stopping places, lower life expectancy to restrictive legislation, Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities in the UK face multiple threats and require urgent support, writes Chris McDonagh of the charity Friends, Families and Travellers.

Chris McDonagh
June 8, 2023
5 minutes

Sport

Breaking down barriers in football

Frustrated by the lack of Asian representation in women’s football in the UK, embroidery artist Nicole Chui joined forces with Baesianz art collective co-founders Sami Kimberley and Sarah Khan in May 2022 to form Baesianz FC, a team for women, trans and non-binary people of Asian heritage. She spoke to Nellie Khossousi about how the London-based club is helping to make football a more inclusive sport. 

Nellie Khossousi
May 31, 2023
5 minutes

Culture

PlayFight: The adultification of Black children

A critically acclaimed piece of theatre, PlayFight holds a mirror up to the systemic racism in schools, particularly the adultification of Black children. Ahead of a run at the Pleasance Theatre in Islington, actor and theatre producer Shereener Browne explains how the play was inspired by a shocking incident in school involving her six-year-old son.

Shereener Browne
May 23, 2023
5 minutes

Criminal Justice

Reimagining justice

A recent parliamentary meeting brought together MPs, barristers and representatives of civil society groups and the Crown Prosecution Service to discuss why British policing is failing marginalised groups and how the problem can be addressed. The Runnymede Trust’s Sophia Purdy-Moore and Nannette Youssef explore the issues raised and call for ‘multiple, holistic responses’ to tackle the entrenched racial disproportionalities in the criminal justice system.

Sophia Purdy-Moore and Nannette Youssef
May 11, 2023
7 minutes

Culture

Championing diversity and inclusion in the great outdoors

During the 2020 lockdown, Haroon Mota founded Muslim Hikers in an attempt to inspire members of his community to take part in outdoor activities in the UK countryside. The organisation has since gone from strength to strength, breaking down barriers, attracting hundreds of people to its monthly events, and collaborating with global brands such as Adidas. Mota spoke to Nellie Khossousi about how his Active Inclusion Network – which includes the Muslim Runners and Muslim Cyclists groups, as well as Muslim Hikers – is making the great outdoors a more accessible and inclusive place.

Nellie Khossousi
May 4, 2023
7 minutes

Migration

Making the case for abolishing borders

Gracie Mae Bradley and Luke de Noronha’s powerful and thought-provoking book Against Borders argues that borders harm all of us – by dividing families and workers, fuelling racial division and reinforcing global disparities – and must be scrapped. In this edited extract, the authors explain why it is vital that anti-racists join the fight for abolition. 

Gracie Mae Bradley and Luke de Noronha
April 26, 2023
7 minutes

History

Dear Stephen: Race and belonging 30 years on

On 22 April 1993, a young aspiring architect, Stephen Lawrence, was murdered in a racist attack in Eltham, southeast London. His death had a seismic impact on British society, shining a spotlight on its racial inequities, prejudices, discrimination and violence. It also prompted the landmark Macpherson report, which brought the issue of institutional racism into the mainstream and whose findings were echoed in the recent Casey report. To mark the 30th anniversary of Stephen’s death, the Runnymede Trust and the Stephen Lawrence Day Foundation have jointly produced a new report, Dear Stephen: Race and belonging 30 years on, that honours his life and legacy. Here is the introduction to this vital piece of research. 

The Runnymede Trust and the Stephen Lawrence Day Foundation
April 21, 2023
5 minutes

Culture

Optimism but not delusion: Journalism and the Black diaspora

Award-winning author, broadcaster and University of Manchester sociology professor Gary Younge’s new book, Dispatches from the Diaspora: From Nelson Mandela to Black Lives Matter, is a powerful and illuminating collection of journalism about race, racism and Black life and death. The former Guardian columnist and editor-at-large speaks to Shafik Meghji about covering Nelson Mandela as a rookie reporter, why he doesn’t worry about pigeonholing, how the British media has changed with regards to race, and why Stormzy makes him optimistic.

Shafik Meghji
April 12, 2023
7 minutes

Policing

History repeating: British policing and Black communities

In a personal response to the recent Casey Review, the Runnymede Trust’s Sophia Purdy-Moore says Black communities are tired and traumatised by the repeated failure to tackle institutional racism in British policing.

Sophia Purdy-Moore
April 1, 2023
5 minutes

Housing

Housing: a burning issue

As the recent death of a Bangladeshi man in an east London flat fire tragically highlighted, Black and minority ethnic communities too often live in overcrowded and unsafe conditions. This is nothing new says the Runnymede Trust’s Dr Shabna Begum, whose new book, From Sylhet to Spitalfields, tells the story of a momentous Bengali squatters’ movement in the 1970s that offers vital lessons for today’s housing challenges. 

Dr Shabna Begum
March 24, 2023
5 minutes

Migration

Challenging divisive language against refugees

In January, Holocaust survivor and educator Joan Salter MBE challenged Home Secretary Suella Braverman over the divisive language she used against refugees. A video of the encounter went viral and has been viewed millions of times. In an interview carried out before the BBC-Gary Lineker row, Joan talked to journalist Kitty Melrose about escaping the Nazis, her Holocaust education work, and how language used by politicians can increase hatred and racist violence in society. 

Kitty Melrose
March 17, 2023
5 minutes

Climate emergency

Muslim voices against climate injustice

Despite being disproportionately impacted by the climate emergency globally, Muslim communities are under-represented in the climate movement. A new campaign – Two Billion Strong – aims to change that and encourage more Muslims to speak up against climate injustice, as Zahrah Vawda and Nazia Sultana explain. 

Zahrah Vawda and Nazia Sultana
March 9, 2023
5 minutes

Education

Addressing racist bullying in schools

Children facing racist bullying at school need support from teachers, but many don’t get it, according to Dr Maria Sapouna, Dr Leyla De Amicis and Professor Loris Vezzali, the authors of a new international study. 

Dr Maria Sapouna, Dr Leyla De Amicis and Professor Loris Vezzali
February 24, 2023
5 minutes

Culture

Engaging Black audiences in rural areas

The arts, culture and heritage sector in rural areas of the UK must do more to engage Black communities, says communications and engagement consultant Elma Glasgow. 

Elma Glasgow
February 17, 2023
5 minutes

Criminal Justice

Ethnic minority communities are bearing the brunt of legal aid cuts

Cuts to legal aid – which helps people meet the cost of legal advice, family mediation and representation in court – are hitting Black and minority ethnic communities the hardest and the situation is set to get worse. Angela Jackman KC (Hon) explains why urgent action is needed. 

Angela Jackman KC (Hon)
February 3, 2023
7 minutes

Migration

Tackling the crisis in the asylum system

Amid further deaths in the Channel, demands for a public inquiry into the shocking treatment of people seeking asylum at the Manston processing centre, and reports that dozens of asylum-seeking children have been kidnapped by criminal gangs from a Brighton hotel managed by the Home Office, Mark Davies of the Refugee Council calls on the government to take urgent action to resolve the crisis.

Mark Davies
January 27, 2023
5 minutes

Criminal Justice

Over-policed and under-protected

A new Runnymede Trust briefing reveals how the rate of police officers in UK schools is leaving Black and minority ethnic pupils over-policed and under-protected, as highlighted by the shocking Child Q case. Rather than criminalising our children, we need greater investment in pastoral care and support systems, and to address systemically rooted inequalities, says Dr Shabna Begum, head of research at the Runnymede Trust.

Dr Shabna Begum
January 16, 2023
5 minutes

Migration

Remembering the Ugandan Asian expulsion 50 years on

On 4 August 1972, Ugandan dictator Idi Amin issued a decree: all non-citizen Asians living in the country had 90 days to leave. Of about 80,000 people, around 28,000 went to the UK, making and building their lives in their coloniser’s homeland. Fifty years on, travel writer and editor Meera Dattani explores what this means for a second-generation British Ugandan Asian.

Meera Dattani
December 7, 2022
7 minutes

Identity

Uncovering Britain's hidden Muslim heritage

An award-winning travel writer, author and journalist specialising in Muslim heritage and culture, Tharik Hussain has written the ‘Hidden Muslim Britain’ chapter of the new Lonely Planet book Experience Great Britain – the first time the subject has been covered in a mainstream travel guide. 

Tharik Hussain
November 22, 2022
5 minutes

Climate emergency

Supporting an inclusive transition to a green economy

As the COP27 summit continues in Egypt, an innovative new programme in the UK is providing Black and minority ethnic young people with the skills and contacts needed to thrive in the green economy. Jessica Tomico and Xavier Baker explain how it works.

Jessica Tomico and Xavier Baker
November 15, 2022
5 minutes

Climate emergency

Why we can’t tackle the environmental emergency without tackling racism

As the COP27 summit gets underway in Egypt this week it’s vital to remember that the legacy of colonialism has ensured racism and the environmental emergency are inextricably linked. Earlier this year a report by the Runnymede Trust and Greenpeace examined the impact of this discrimination and provided a rallying call for environmental justice. In a piece originally published in July by Greenpeace, climate activist and ornithologist Dr Mya-Rose Craig explores the issues.

Dr Mya-Rose Craig
November 8, 2022
5 minutes

Criminal Justice

The Public Order Bill: Preventing protest

The Public Order Bill will make it much harder for people at the sharp edge of state violence – marginalised communities in particular – to protest against injustice, says Liberty’s Jun Pang.

Jun Pang
November 1, 2022
5 minutes

Migration

Challenging No Recourse to Public Funds

The government’s No Recourse to Public Funds policy – which prevents most people seeking asylum in the UK from accessing vital support – was one of the key topics under discussion at the Runnymede Trust’s recent We Move summit. Campaigners Solomon Adegbulugbe and Pascale Robinson explain why the policy – which the Runnymede Trust is urging Prime Minister Rishi Sunak to scrap – is so damaging and how it can be challenged.

Solomon Adegbulugbe and Pascale Robinson
October 26, 2022
4 minutes

Economy

Ethnic minority households will be among the hardest hit by the cost of living crisis

We are hurtling into one of the biggest economic crises the UK seen in living memory. Kathryn Zacharek explains why low-income ethnic minority households, at the intersection of multiple disadvantages, will be among of the worst hit, and what support is out there.

Kathryn Zacharek
August 24, 2022
3 minutes

Identity

Conditional Whiteness of Gypsies, Roma and Travellers

Gypsies, Roma, and Travellers find themselves in the odd position of being the point where all conversations and widespread thoughts around race and racism breaks down.

Luke Wenman
August 4, 2022
5 minutes

Education

Afro Hair Matters: How can we ensure we have inclusive hair policies in schools?

Kate Williams talks about the importance of policies of Afro hair as well as advocating for a safe school for children with Afro hair.

Kate Williams
July 18, 2022
5 min

Education

Many young minority ethnic people don't feel a sense of inclusion or belonging at school

Anwar Akhtar, founder and director of the UK arts and journalism charity Samosa Media, talks about his documentary "Schools Apart" which navigates how to make minority ethnic children feel included and represented at school.

Anwar Akhtar
July 15, 2022
6 min

Employment

How Covid exposed the racial segregation rife in the workplace

The pandemic exacerbated the deep rooted racial inequalities already in existence across society. Two and a half years on, Nannette Youssef and Sanmeet Kaur, policy officer at the Runnymede Trust and policy and campaigns support officer at the TUC, assess how Covid exposed blatant racial segregation within UK workplaces.

Nannette Youssef and Sanmeet Kaur
July 7, 2022
6 minutes

Migration

The origins of the Windrush scandal lie in 30 years of racist immigration legislation

To mark Windrush Day 2022, barrister Grace Brown lays out the context and legal circumstances behind the Windrush scandal, and how a buried Home Office report reflects the lack of lessons learned.

Grace Brown
June 22, 2022
4 min

A legacy of Rest and Resistance

As we continue to reel from the murder of George Floyd two long years later, Ellie Ikiebe articulately reinforces rest as a form of resistance. Who gets to rest and who does not? Why is so much chaos left for marginalised communities to fix when it is not their creation? Why are certain demographics of people placed in jobs that see them overworked and underpaid? Why nature is harder to access when you live in an inner city, why does the countryside feels unsafe to many marginalised communities? These questions are important because access to rest is not equally distributed. Rest is an act of political warfare.

Ellie Ikiebe
May 25, 2022
8 minutes

Beauty

It’s not just hair, it’s a tool to navigate society and relationships

Former Runnymede Trust Unbound Trainee, Bowale Fadare, reflects on her visit to the Horniman Museum’s exhibition, Hair: Untold Stories. What is the cultural and political significance of hair, and how can we unlearn discriminatory norms, starting with hair?

Bowale Fadare
May 12, 2022
5 minutes

Identity

Kay Rufai: ‘I love seeing people just be unapologetically themselves’

Christina Orekedo interviews Kay Rufai, creator of the S.M.I.L.E-ing Boys project. The project is a showcase of young Black boys being able to express themselves in a way that our society doesn’t always permit. Our young Black Boys are continuously pigeonholed. From being disproportionately stopped and searched, excluded from school, to simply being overlooked, Kay Rufai transforms this narrative by spotlighting the stories of young Black boys.

Christina Oredeko
April 28, 2022
10 minutes

Migration

“What about us?": the UK’s discriminatory treatment of refugees must end

As the Nationality and Borders Bill progresses through parliament and the government unveil its new plan to offshore refugee to Rwanda, the UK is approaching a crossroads. It either turns its back on the international protection system - which states that refugees must not be penalised based on how they arrive - or provides all refugees with an equal level of dignity and support. Choosing the latter is essential. Sanctuary should never discriminate.

Cameron Boyle
April 19, 2022
5 minutes

Identity

If everyone’s “normal” is different, then different should be the new normal

Born with Cerebral Palsy, now just 17 years old, Yasmin Caulfield's main mission is to use writing as a platform to create resonance and understanding surrounding issues of equality, progression and acceptance, while empowering others to find sanctuary in their individual expression. In this blog piece she gives her thoughts on what 'normal' means, and why different should be the new normal.

Yasmin Caulfield
April 6, 2022
5 minutes

Culture

The underground Bengali music scene of the 80s and 90s: a story largely untold

Ansar Ahmed Ullah reflects on the rise of British Asian underground music scene in the 80s and 90s, which flourished amidst an environment of racial violence and political struggle for self-identity and created a whole new genre.

Ansar Ahmed Ullah
April 1, 2022
3 minutes

Policing

The horrifying abuse of Child Q should catalyse the end of police in schools

Amidst a backdrop of mobilisation against police institutional racism and misogyny in recent years, the case of Child Q sparked a reckoning with the harms of policing in schools.

Remi Joseph-Salisbury and Laura Connelly
March 29, 2022
4 minutes

Politics

The Bill of Rights: undermining rights for Black and ethnic minority groups when they most need protection

The Runnymede Trust's policy team explain why the Governments proposed upheaval of the Human Rights Act would dilute protections for Black and minority ethnic people, at a time when they most need support.

Alba Kapoor and Nannette Youssef
March 16, 2022
6 minutes

Economy

Cutting through the pandemic: the value of Black barbershops

As small Black businesses up and down the country struggle to bounce back from the pandemic, supporting their recovery should be a key aim. Not only will it help repair our local economies, it can help to enhance and protect the health and wellbeing of communities who have been at the sharp end of the pandemic.

Karis Campion
March 10, 2022
4 minutes

Education

Is it that deep? The impact of policing Black British language speakers in British schools

This blog is written by Black Learning Achievement and Mental Health (BLAM UK) to support their work to end linguistic injustice in schools. This piece explains why banning the use of Black British English in UK schools reinforces negative perceptions and stereotypes which are harmful to Black students.

Black Learning Achievement and Mental Health (BLAM UK)
March 2, 2022
3 minutes

Environment

Choked Up: The teenagers campaigning for clean air

Choked Up, a group who describe themselves as “black and brown teenagers from south London”, have set up a campaign for clean air. They explain the links between race and dangerous levels of air pollution in London, and what we can do about it.

Choked Up
February 16, 2022
4 minutes

History

The Importance of Re-Writing Migrant Workers Back into the History of the NHS

PhD student, Kathryn Zacharek explores the importance of rewriting the role of migrants in the NHS.

Kathryn Zacharek
January 20, 2022
6 minutes

History

The New Cross Fire 1981: A Personal Reflection

41 years ago today, 13 teenagers were killed in a fire that swept through 439 New Cross Road, in a suspected racist attack. While most of the country remained silent on the events of that day, Black people the length and breadth of Britain organised, their efforts eventually leading to the Black People’s Day of Action.

Ionie Richards
January 17, 2022
6 minutes

Economy

Shared Futures: conference background and summary

In April 2021, Runnymede Trust colleague Carol Sidney convened 2-day conference Shared Futures in partnership with the National Lottery Community Fund to look at funders, funding & the BME third sector.

Carol Sidney
January 14, 2022
4 minutes

Health

The Health and Care Bill and the continuity of inequality

"It was disappointing to see that tackling ethnic health inequalities was not mentioned separately in the Health & Care Bill"

Owen Chinembiri
December 15, 2021
4 minutes

Politics

Listen to us: it's time to scrap the Policing Bill

Encompassing a crack down on everything from the right to protest to expanding the use of stop and search powers, the Bill constitutes draconian measures which will entrench racial discrimination and curtail civil liberties.

Nannette Youssef & Emmanuelle Andrews
December 8, 2021
6 minutes

Migration

The hostile environment and pandemic combined: refugees and asylum seekers’ experiences of life in the UK

The combined impacts of the pandemic with hostile environment policies have created a highly precarious situation, and until the hostile treatment of migrants changes, the precarity and vulnerability of asylum seekers and refugees – in pandemic and non-pandemic times –will remain.

Robin Finlay, Peter Hopkins and Matt Benwell
January 7, 2022
5 minutes

Identity

Black British Voices project: Major national study aims to redefine Black Britishness

A collaborative project between The Voice, Cambridge University and I-Cubed is an opportunity to help us understand how the community is feeling about certain issues.

Paula Dykes
November 5, 2021
3 minutes

History

Black History Month - How far have we really come?

As Black History month draws to a close after weeks of curated events and celebrations pertaining to black history and heritage in the UK, Runnymede Unbound Trainee, Sisanda Myataza, contemplates how far race relations have really progressed in Britain today.

Sisanda Myataza
October 29, 2021
5 minutes

Politics

Voter ID: a disproportionate solution to an invisible problem

Runnymede's Senior Policy Officer, Alba Kapoor, gives an in-depth look at the Elections Bill and why mandatory Voter ID poses a threat of disenfranchisement to certain voters in the UK.

Alba Kapoor
July 9, 2021
5 minutes

Education

Decolonising the curriculum: the importance of teacher training and development

Martin Johnson and Melissa Mouthaan
June 25, 2021
7 minutes

Migration

The case of Osime Brown: the young autistic man facing deportation

Raoul Walawalker
November 6, 2021
4 minutes

Identity

A tale of progress or a story of stereotypes? BME representation on film

Leon Williams
April 6, 2021

Education

BLM and education: are we any closer to a school system that works for all?

Sophia Purdy-Moore
March 6, 2021

Criminal Justice

A year since George Floyd's death, the struggle must continue

Kingsley Sheteh Newuh
May 25, 2021

Criminal Justice

One Year On

Remembering George Floyd on the anniversary of his death.

Runnymede Trust
May 25, 2021
2 minutes

Criminal Justice

Mohamud Hassan's family are still waiting for answers

Last year, a young man of Somali heritage died after being taken into police custody in Wales. It is a familiar story: he sustained injuries, but the police deny excessive force. Raoul Walawalker, a writer for Immigration News – which is part of an organisation of UK and Ireland immigration lawyers – interviews an activist who is helping the family.

Raoul Walawalker
May 14, 2021
4 minutes

Criminal Justice

28 years after Stephen Lawrence's murder, how far have we really come?

Today marks 28 years since the murder of Stephen Lawrence, which led to the landmark Macpherson Report on institutional racism. Runnymede's Unbound trainee, Bowale Fadare, interrogates how much has truly changed in Britain.

Bowale Fadare
April 22, 2021
5 minutes

Criminal Justice

Today, we remember Stephen Lawrence

Remembering who Stephen Lawrence was.

Runnymede
April 22, 2021
2 minutes

Islamophobia

Islamophobia: a problem rife across the political spectrum

Islamophobia isn't just something that manifests on the far-right – it is present in our political parties, our journalism and wider society. With Islamophobic hate crime on the rise, journalist Taj Ali says that we must confront the size of the problem, and take it more seriously.

Taj Ali
April 16, 2021
4 minutes

Migration

Has the COVID-19 pandemic changed media discourse on immigration?

The UK is a hostile environment for migrants – as is its media. But when the pandemic struck, and papers across the political spectrum encouraged us to applaud migrant workers, it looked like sentiment might be shifting. Cameron Boyle, political correspondent for the Immigration Advice Service, decided to investigate further.

Cameron Boyle
April 15, 2021
5 minutes

History

More than a viral story: the people's struggle for the Suez Canal

What is the history of the Suez Canal? After it was blocked last month, it became a viral news story but Mohja Amer noticed a lack of acknowledgement of the canal's colonial history. This article goes into depth exploring just that.

Mohja Amer
April 13, 2021
6 minutes

History

How the War of Independence Forged a Culture of Resistance among British Bangladeshis

March 26th 2021 marks 50 years since the start of Bangladesh’s independence struggle, which rapidly turned into a genocide in which around 3 million people were killed. This war is rarely spoken of today and remains unacknowledged and forgotten by the international community. Dr Halima Begum, CEO of the Runnymede Trust, was born in rural Sylhet and raised in London’s East End, she tells us what today signifies for her and her family.

Halima Begum
March 26, 2021
7 minutes

History

A struggle of memory: the history of the Bengali squatters movement

This month marks 45 years since the height of the Bengali squatters movement – yet accounts of Bengali housing activism have been overlooked and erased in the mainstream ever since. Today, PhD research student Shabna Begum remembers.

Shabna Begum
March 19, 2021
5 minutes

Education

Decolonising history is not 'censorship' - in fact it is the opposite

A politician recently suggested that efforts to 'decolonise the curriculum' are a form of censorship. Considering the reality of censorship throughout British history, journalist Taj Ali explains why these statements are wrong.

Taj Ali
March 18, 2021
5 minutes

Criminal Justice

March 13th Clapham Bandstand: an Anonymous Account

On Saturday 13th March 2021, a vigil was held in Clapham Common following the death of Sarah Everard. Unfortunately, scenes turned violent. An anonymous attendee gives us their eyewitness account.

Rohini Kahrs
March 16, 2021
2 minutes

Policing

Pontins and 'No Irish Need Apply': the prejudice that refuses to die

Professor Louise Ryan and Professor Don MacRaild, of the Centre for Global Diversities and Inequalities at London Metropolitan University, explain how Pontins institutional discrimination links to Britain's long history of anti-Irish and anti-Traveller discrimination.

Louise Ryan and Don MacRaild
December 3, 2021
4 minutes

Politics

The government is using its 'diverse' cabinet to deflect from racial inequality

The government has routinely attacked 'identity politics' – yet Boris Johnson's diverse cabinet is often held up as a beacon of representation. Journalist and former Ethnic Minorities Officer of Warwick Students' Union Taj Ali points out this contradiction and argues that Johnson's government must prioritise economics over optics.

Taj Ali
January 29, 2021
5 minutes

Politics

The government must not use pseudo-science to dismiss Covid's impact on BME communities

The government has suggested, on more than one occasion, that different ethnic groups are naturally more susceptible to COVID-19. Runnymede's research analyst Adam Almeida explains why theories about vitamin D deflect from the real issue: structural inequality.

Adam Almeida
January 25, 2021
4 minutes

Identity

The weaponisation of the 'left-behind white working class'

The phrase 'left-behind white working class' is now a regular staple in government rhetoric around equality. But how accurate is the concept? Nick Treloar, dissects the use of the term, and argues that it is weaponised by the government. 

Nick Treloar
January 14, 2021
4 minutes

Education

Students have called out institutional racism for decades. A new report confirms our experiences

University students have a long history of organising against racism on campus – but anti-racist action from the top-down has been slow. In light of a new report on racial harassment in higher education, journalist and former student representative Taj Ali lays out the state of things.

Taj Ali
May 1, 2021
4 minutes

Migration

The true impact of the Jamaica 50 deportations

After the media flurry, Zita Holbourne, national chair of Black Activists Rising Against Cuts (BARAC), documents the harrowing details of the Jamaica deportations and explains why the fight must continue.

Zita Holbourne
December 18, 2020
6 minutes

Migration

The Stansted 15 appeal: a symbol of our right to protest in the UK

Back in 2017, a group of 15 activists made headlines when they halted a charter flight that would deport 60 people from the UK. After some were given suspended jail sentences, and others, community orders, the group are now appealing their convictions. Raoul Walawalker, feature writer at the Immigration Advice Service platform ImmiNews, explains the importance of their case and subsequent appeal.

Raoul Walawalker
March 12, 2020
5 minutes

History

Black history legacies: Claudia Jones

Micha Frazer-Carroll
October 30, 2020
6 minutes

Environment

The fight isn't over for Elephant and Castle's Latin American community

Read all about London's Latin American communities fight to keep their communities un-gentrified and where the elephant and castle shopping centre fits into it.

Santiago Peluffo, Patria Roman-Velazquez and Natalia Perez
October 22, 2020
5 minutes

Health

Ethnic inequalities in Covid-19 are playing out again - how can we stop them?

New research by The Runnymede Trust and IPPR and co-authored by Dr Parth Patel (IPPR) and Alba Kapoor and Nick Treloar, Runnymede Trust's Policy Officer and Research Analyst respectively, has found that Covid is once again operating along racial lines.

Nick Treloar
October 19, 2020

History

Black History legacies: Stuart Hall

This Black History Month, the Race Matters blog is spotlighting people and movements that have played important roles in black British history, especially those whose contributions are often overlooked. This week, Acting Online Editor Micha Frazer-Carroll looks at the work of an academic, activist and cultural pioneer, Stuart Hall.

Micha Frazer-Carroll
September 10, 2020
6 minutes

Education

Why I'm taking legal action against the government's new school guidelines

The government recently introduced new guidelines for the teaching of Relationships and Sex Education – stating schools must not use materials from anti-capitalist groups, promote "victim narratives" or make certain accusations against state institutions. Marsha Garratt, an anti-racist researcher, educator and lecturer, explains why the Coalition of Anti-Racist Educators has launched legal action against the government to challenge the guidance.

Marsha Garratt
May 10, 2020
4 minutes

Culture

So you've read a lot of books on anti-racism - now what?

Following Black Lives Matter, there's been a surge in interest in anti-racist literature – but what do you do once you've done all the reading? Banseka Kayembe, founder of Naked Politics, offers some pointers for allies in the struggle against racism.

Banseka Kayembe
September 18, 2020
6 minutes

History

Beyond Banglatown: the rich history of Brick Lanes curry restaurants

A new research project by Runnymede, in conjunction with the University of Manchester, sheds light on the rich history of Brick Lane's curry restaurants. Here, research associate Sundeep Lidher explains why the team have turned their findings into an educational resource that is accessible to all.

Sundeep Lidher
July 31, 2020
6 minutes
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