Education

Teaching Migration, Belonging and Empire in Secondary Schools

Written by:
Kimberly McIntosh, Jason Todd and Nandini Das
Published:
2019
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'Teaching Migration, Belonging and Empire in Secondary Schools' is a report from the Runnymede Trust and the University of Liverpool's TIDE Project, which explains why a new approach to teaching migration, belonging and empire is required to reflect changing classroom demographics.

Nearly 17%, one in six, of children aged 0-15 in England and Wales are from Black and minority ethnic (BME) backgrounds, and BME young people make up around 27%, more than one in four, of state-funded primary and secondary school pupils.

Inclusion and representation are important. However, teaching migration, belonging, and empire is not relevant to students from current ethnic minorities alone. It offers all young people a fuller understanding of the varied and wide-ranging cultural inputs that have contributed to the making of Britain.

The report highlights that a survey of teachers carried out by the Runnymede Trust, University of Manchester and University of Cambridge education project Our Migration Story found that 78 percent of teachers surveyed wanted training on teaching migration and 71 per cent on teaching empire.

Runnymede Trust and theIDE Project, Belonging andEmpire in Secondary Schools', explains why a new approach to teaching migration, belonging and empire is required to reflect changing classroom demographics.

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