Employment and Economy

Our report on Race and Class, published in March 2017.

Read our briefing on the 2015 Budget and its impact on BME families.

Since our founding in 1968 Runnymede has focused on outcomes in the labour market. In 2015 Black and minority ethnic people remain more likely to be unemployed, to work in low wage jobs, and earn less over their lifetimes. This is true even where people have strong qualifications. Evidence suggests racial discrimination explains part of this gap, as people with African- or Asian- sounding surnames have to send in twice as many CVs just to get an interview even where they have the same qualifications as people with white British - sounding surnames.

In addition to work on the labour market, we have also looked at wider economic issues, including pensions and a large programme of work on financial inclusion. We will continue to investigate labour market outcomes as the economy slowly recovers, and argue for policy interventions that directly respond to continuing inequalities in the labour market - for both low-paid and high-income earners.

Our recent Local Ethnic Inequalities report outlines ethnic inequalities in unemployment rates as one of its key indicators, while in 2012 we produced an Unemployment and ethnicity briefing.